Publications

Below you can find a list of the most important publications by members of our research team. A full list of publications of each member features on their individual member profiles.

EU Policies and Decision-Making

  • Andreu Casas, DAVESA, Ferran & Mariluz Congosto (2016) "Media coverage of a 'connective action': The interaction between the 15-M movement and the mass media," Revista Española de Investigaciones Sociológicas, 155(1), 73-96.
    category: Peer-reviewed article
    This article uses Twitter messages sent in May 2011 to study the ability of the so-called 15-M movement, a “connective” movement, to place their demands on the media agenda and maintain control over their own discourse. The results show that the activists’ discourse included many issues, although greatest attention was given to three: electoral and party systems, democracy and governance, and civil liberties. Moreover, the study reveals that the media covered all the movement’s issues and that activists maintained their plural discourse throughout the protest. This article contributes to the literature on ‘connective’ social movements, showing that in certain circumstances these movements have the capacity to determine media coverage.
  • DUPONT, Claire (2016) Climate Policy Integration into EU Energy Policy. Progress and Prospects. London: Routledge
    category: Book
    Climate change is a cross-cutting, long-term, global problem that presents policymakers with many challenges in their efforts to respond to the issue. Integrating climate policy objectives into the elaboration and agreement of policy measures in other sectors represents one promising method for ensuring coherent policies that respond adequately to the climate change challenge. This book explores the integration of long-term climate policy objectives into EU energy policy. It engages in-depth empirical analysis on the integration of climate policy objectives into renewable energy policy; energy performance of buildings; and policies in support of natural gas importing infrastructure. The book describes insufficient levels of climate policy integration across these areas to achieve the long-term policy goals. A conceptual framework to find reasons for insufficient integration levels is developed and applied. This book is a valuable resource for students, researchers, academics and policymakers interested in environmental, climate change and energy policy development in the EU, particularly from the perspective of long-term policy challenges. The book adds to scholarly literature on policy integration and EU integration, and contributes to new and developing research about EU decarbonisation.
  • OBERTHüR, Sebastian & DUPONT, Claire (2015) Decarbonization in the European Union: Internal Policies and External Strategies. Houndsmill: Palgrave MacMillan.
    category: Book
    The authors examine how far internal policies in the European Union move towards the objective of reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the EU by 80-95 per cent by 2050, and how or whether the EU's 2050 objective to 'decarbonise' could affect the EU's relations with a number of external energy partners.
  • OBERTHüR, Sebastian & DUPONT, Claire (2015) "The European Union," In: Bäckstrand, Karin, and Eva Lövbrand (Eds.) Research Handbook on Climate Governance. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, pp. 224-236.
    category: Book Chapter
    no abstract available
  • ROOS, Christof (2015) "EU politics on labour migration: Inclusion versus admission," Cambridge Review of International Affairs, 28(1), 536-553.
    category: Peer-reviewed article
    Two European Union (EU) directives on labour migration were adopted in 2009 and 2011. The EU scheme to attract highly qualified migrants, the so-called ‘Blue Card’ directive of 2009, allows member states broad flexibility in implementation. In contrast, the directive on a single permit for migrant workers and their rights of 2011 is far less flexible. It does significantly reduce the scope for derogations at a national level to a minimum. How can this variance in output be explained? Institutional rules are shown to be a key factor. The involvement of the European Parliament as co-legislator alongside the Council limited member states’ influence on legal outputs. The comparison of policy outputs between the two cases points to differences in actor orientations: rather than seeking to increase labour migration into the EU by defining expansive admission conditions, the common EU policy seeks to include migrant workers by defining their rights.
  • ROOS, Christof & ZAUN, Natascha (2014) "Norms Matter! The role of international norms in EU policies on asylum and immigration," European Journal of Migration and Law, Vol. 16, No. 1, p. 45-68
    category: Peer-reviewed article
    This Article investigates how international norms impact on eu asylum and immigration policy. To this end we scrutinize the assumption that the robustness of international norms indicates the quality of eu integration. Drawing on international norms literature we argue that four characters define an international norms’ robustness: specificity in definition, binding force, coherence with domestic law and international law, and concordant understanding among actors. Our analysis covers three eu policy areas, asylum policy, family reunification policy, and labour migration policy. Across the three areas international norms had varying degrees of robustness at the time of eu negotiations. The findings show that presence and robustness of international norms on asylum or immigration regulation are reflected in eu legislation. Given that there are more robust norms available on questions of status than on reception conditions or asylum procedures, the qualification directive was much easier to agree on than the reception conditions or the asylum procedures directive which were much more characterized by hard bargaining. The international norm, right to family life, was sufficiently robust and was codified in eu law. However, both the international norm and the eu law do not provide for clear admission criteria. On labour migration, robust international norms with regard to equality provisions for migrant workers are mirrored in eu legislation on residence rights of migrants. With regard to conditions of admission, the absence of international norms indicates little to no eu legislation.
  • SHAHIN, Jamal, WOODWARD, Alison & TERZIS, G. (2013) "The impact of the crisis on civil society organizations in the EU: Risks and opportunities," Open Citizenship, Vol. 4, No. 1, p. 12-22
    category: Peer-reviewed article
    no abstract
  • Katja Biedenkopf & DUPONT, Claire (2013) "A toolbox approach to the EU's External Climate Governance," In: A. Boening; J. Kremer; and A. Van Loon (Eds.) Global Power Europe. Heidelberg: Springer, pp. 181-199.
    category: Book Chapter
    no abstract available
  • ROOS, Christof (2013) The EU and Immigration Policies: Cracks in the Walls of Fortress Europe? Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.
    category: Book
    This book explores how and why the EU and its member states define immigration policies. A comparison of EU negotiations on five EU immigration directives reveals interests of actors in EU integration and whether common policies aim at a restriction or expansion of immigration to the EU.
  • ROOS, Christof (2013) "How to overcome deadlock in EU Immigration Politics," International Migration, 51(6), 67-79.
    category: Peer-reviewed article
    Immigration policy is a very unlikely case for EU integration. EU policy-making is constrained by member states' sovereignty claims and interest heterogeneity. Still, tentative integration towards EU conditions of entry and residence for some immigrant categories can be observed. By using the example of the skilled labour migration directive, the article explains how deadlock in policy-making was overcome. It explores the factors that led to agreement in the EU immigration policy area, from the Commission's first proposal on labour migration in 2001 to its adoption in 2009. Explanations for integration in the policy area are member states' venue shopping the EU level for changing domestic legislation, their interest in locking-in national standards in EU law, and the EU Commission's agenda-framing. Strategic partitioning of policy was also used by actors to overcome deadlock in policy-making. The reframing of policies, by reducing their scope to a few narrowly defined immigrant categories, influenced their adoption. This mechanism was observed in studying the eight years of policy-making leading to the labour migration directive. The longitudinal analysis helps to identify the key dynamics that define this nascent EU policy area.
  • DUPONT, Claire & OBERTHüR, Sebastian (2012) "Insufficient climate policy integration in EU energy policy: the importance of the long-term perspective," Journal of Contemporary European Research , 8(2): 228-247.
    category: Peer-reviewed article
    This article assesses and explains the level of climate policy integration (CPI) in the EU’s energy sector, and challenges the widespread assumption that a high level of CPI has been achieved in this sector. We introduce a conceptualisation of CPI and outline an analytical framework to explain levels of CPI, drawing on environmental Policy Integration (EPI) literature and on theories of European integration. We thus add conceptual value by bringing strands of EPI literature together and situating them in broader theories of European integration. We analyse CPI in two cases of energy policy: the EU’s renewable energy (RE) policy and EU policies on gas pipelines. We argue that even in the relatively climate-friendly RE case, the level of CPI remains insufficient to reach long-term climate policy objectives. CPI has been virtually absent in the EU’s gas import pipeline policy. The lack of CPI may remain hidden without taking a long-term perspective. The explanatory framework helps us in understanding the insufficient levels of CPI and the differences between the cases. We argue that serious consideration of long-term climate objectives in the policy process is fundamental for the occurrence of CPI.